10.11.06

The Great Revulsion.

There always have been and always will be conservatives on the American political scene. And that’s as it should be: a diversity of views is part of what makes democracy vital.

But we may be seeing the downfall of movement conservatism — the potent alliance of wealthy individuals, corporate interests and the religious right that took shape in the 1960s and 1970s. This alliance may once have had something to do with ideas, but it has become mainly a corrupt political machine, and America will be a better place if that machine breaks down.

Why do I want to see movement conservatism crushed? Partly because the movement is fundamentally undemocratic; its leaders don’t accept the legitimacy of opposition. Democrats will only become acceptable, declared Grover Norquist, the president of Americans for Tax Reform, once they “are comfortable in their minority status.” He added, “Any farmer will tell you that certain animals run around and are unpleasant, but when they’ve been fixed, then they are happy and sedate.”

And the determination of the movement to hold on to power at any cost has poisoned our political culture. Just think about the campaign that just ended, with its coded racism, deceptive robo-calls, personal smears, homeless men bused in to hand out deceptive fliers, and more. Not to mention the constant implication that anyone who questions the Bush administration or its policies is very nearly a traitor.

When movement conservatism took it over, the Republican Party ceased to be the party of Dwight Eisenhower and became the party of Karl Rove. The good news is that Karl Rove and the political tendency he represents may both have just self-destructed.

Two years ago, people were talking about permanent right-wing dominance of American politics. But since then the American people have gotten a clearer sense of what rule by movement conservatives means. They’ve seen the movement take us into an unnecessary war, and botch every aspect of that war. They’ve seen a great American city left to drown; they’ve seen corruption reach deep into our political process; they’ve seen the hypocrisy of those who lecture us on morality.

And they just said no.


Paul Krugman, no New York Times (sublinhados meus).

4 Comments:

Blogger Joao Galamba said...

O Luis e esse senhor Krugman são mas é uns anti-americanos do pior, e não passam de uns deserdados do sol na terra. A Helena Matos, senhora que tenho em grande estima, já me tinha avisado sobre voceses naquelas paginas luminosas que tão bem me tem feito à cabeça.

Cumprimentos,

João Galamba

10:49 da manhã  
Blogger Luis M. Jorge said...

Numa palavra, João: oui.

11:44 da manhã  
Blogger Ricardo Sebastião said...

"the movement is fundamentally undemocratic; its leaders don’t accept the legitimacy of opposition"

Então mas o Clinton não esteve no poder 8 anos? O partido democrata ganhou as eleições de ontem e houve guerra civil por causa disso? Enfim...

"he constant implication that anyone who questions the Bush administration or its policies is very nearly a traitor."

verdade, o Bush abusou de várias coisas sim sr.

"Two years ago, people were talking about permanent right-wing dominance of American politics"

(Curioso, o mesmo se pode dizer actualmente do governo PS) Mas tão depressa o autor critica quem afirmou isto como cai no mesmo erro ao afirmar "But we may be seeing the downfall of movement conservatism"

A vida política é feita de ciclos mais nada...

Até tinha o Krugman em boa conta pelo que estudei dele no curso de economia, mas baixou sem dúvida alguns pontos com este artigo

1:26 da tarde  
Blogger dass said...

Do meu ponto de vista é uma análise brilhante.

3:27 da tarde  

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